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  • Pre-Columbian, Southern Peru, ca. 200 to 400 CE. A lovely pair of gold and silver earspools; front section solid high-karat gold, each decorated with twin joined birds in dancing pose; reverse solid silver rounded plugs. Includes custom stand. Size: 1.5" L x .75" H (3.8 cm x 1.9 cm)

    Provenance: Ex-private Toronto, Canada Collection; ex-private Los Angeles, CA collection.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Nazca Gold / Silver Ear Spools - Matched Pair

  • Pre-Columbian, Colombia, Tairona, ca. 1000 CE. These pendants are made of pale greenstone and look abstractly like a small bat head flanked by long, narrow wings. There are simple carvings at the end of each wing. The heads have an open space, probably to run a string through. Bat-wing pendants served as grave goods and are very common in the Tairona region. For example, in a burial from the Venezuelan Andes (which was culturally close to Tairona), archaeologists found a bat-wing pendant interred alongside raw materials of serpetinite and steatite. Size of largest: 5.5" L x .25" W x .75" H (14 cm x 0.6 cm x 1.9 cm)

    Provenance: Ex-Denenberg Fine Arts; ex-David Bernstein, acquired 1985.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Two Fine Tairona Stone Bat-Wing Pendants - Ex Bernstein

  • Pre-Columbian, Colombia, Tairona, ca. 1000 CE. This is a pale greenstone pendant that is shaped like an abstract bat head with long, thin wings and a hole for suspension. There are simple carvings at the end of each wing. Bat-wing pendants served as grave goods and are very common in the Tairona region. For example, in a burial from the Venezuelan Andes (which was culturally close to Tairona), archaeologists found a bat-wing pendant interred alongside raw materials of serpetinite and steatite. Size: 5.25" L x .25" W x 1.25" H (13.3 cm x 0.6 cm x 3.2 cm)

    Provenance: Ex-Denenberg Fine Arts, Los Angeles, CA, prior ex-David Bernstein, NYC, NY in 1985.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Tairona Greenstone Bat-Wing Pendant, Ex- D. Bernstein

  • China, Tang Dynasty, ca. 600-800 CE. This is a sancai glazed hollow dromedary camel with saddle and saddle bags. The saddle bags are in the shape of a grotesque face with bulding jowls. "Sancai" means "three colors" and is a type of decoration in Chinese pottery using intermingled colors for decoration; it is diagnostic of the Tang Dynasty. A piece like this would have been made by using white clay and firing them, then applying glaze tinted with copper for green and iron for amber/brownish yellow. Three major kilns in northern China were responsible for making these pieces, which were designed to go into the tombs of Tang aristocracy. Burial wares were fired at lower temperatures and cast in sections in molds with the parts put together using clay slip. Many of these pieces have degrees of individuality that come from hand carving of smaller features like, in this case, the face of the camel and the face on the saddle bags. The Tang Dynasty was a thrilling time in Chinese history, when trade flourished along the Silk Routes and unified China was the richest country on earth. Chang'an (now Xi'an) was the Tang capital, and it was one of the most cosmopolitan cities on earth, filled with foreigners who had travelled to China to trade; the influence of foreigners and talented native Chinese, combined with the economic prosperity brought on by trade and the new religion from India, Buddhism, created a powerful cultural milieu where poetry and other forms of art flourished. This camel is a reminder of the importance of trade; the dromedary is native to the Middle East and the Horn of Africa and was used as a pack animal on the overland Silk Routes. Size: 6" L x 3" W x 7.5" H (15.2 cm x 7.6 cm x 19 cm)

    Provenance: Ex-private Simonian collection, Los Angeles, CA, acquired before 1982.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Chinese Tang Dynasty Sancai Glazed Camel

  • Western Africa, possibly Dan, ca. 20th century. This is a passport mask, carried by people in Western Africa as miniature copies of a mask worn during performances; they were either sewn onto a piece of cloth and kept in a leather pouch, worn on the small of the back, or worn on the arm or neck to act as an amulet. They are called "passport masks" because they are worn by people when travelling. It is made of wood, with a red painted face, blank half-moon white eyes, long black hair, framing the face, and a prominent chin (which is characteristic of the style). Similarly painted red masks were used for warding against bush fires during the dry season. Size: 2" L x 3.5" W x 4.25" H (5.1 cm x 8.9 cm x 10.8 cm)

    Provenance: Ex-Pearson collection acquired at Arte Primitivo, NYC, NY.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    20th C. African Dan Painted Wood Passport Mask

  • South Asia, Nepal, ca. 1750 CE. A gorgeous, gold gilded and lacquered copper repousse panel depicting a standing Bodhisattva Avalokitesvara, with four arms raised holding attributes in each hand, standing atop two deer, the entire composition before a full body mandorla and atop a half lotus throne. Beyond the intricate composition, luxurious nature of the materials, and fine artistry exhibited in this example, is the deeply symbolic and sacred iconography of the piece. Avalokitesvara is a Sanskrit name that literally means "the lord who looks upon the world with compassion." The embodiment of ultimate compassion, Avalokitesvara (Quan Yin or Kuan Shih Yin in Chinese) took a vow to liberate all sentient beings of the universe from suffering. The term Bodhisattva is derived from the word bodhi which means enlightenment, and a bodhisattva is an enlightened being who foregoes entering paradise in order to assist others to achieve enlightenment or buddhahood. Bodhisattvas are among the most compassionate beings in the universe, devoting themselves to saving the suffering. Traditionally depicted as less austere than Buddhas with graceful postures and elegant garments, this piece is no exception. Attached to a wood base section with turning pins for easy removal if desired. Size: piece itself measures 7-3/4" x 6" x 1-1/4" (19.7 x 15.3 x 3.2 cm); 9-5/8" high with base.

    Provenance: Ex-private northern Colorado collection.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    18th C. Nepalese Gilded Copper Panel - Bodhisattva

  • PRICE ON REQUEST

    Southeast Asia, Thailand, ca. 16th to 17th century CE. Near monumental in scale, this head of Buddha of the Thai Ayuthia period was expertly carved from gray sandstone. His face displays an expression of the utmost serenity with downcast eyes below gracefully arched eyebrows, a noble nose, and gently smiling lips, clearly a visage that could inspire hours peaceful meditation. The head of the Buddha is perhaps the most significant element of the deity as it represents the immense body of knowledge and wisdom of Buddha along with the tranquil nature that emanates from its expression. Oversized as we see in this example with a large Ushnisha, the cranial lump on the head, the Buddha's head symbolizes the wisdom and knowledge acquired after attaining enlightenment. Furthermore, the curled, short hair of the Buddha signifies the nobility of Buddha. Beyond the multi-layered meaning embodied in the iconography of this piece, the technique executed to create the meticulously carved coiffure and ushnisha comprised of countless neat curls and the absolute smoothness of the contours of that face is paramount, and the artistry is simply remarkable! A rare and sublime piece of history that has survived many centuries! Custom wood block base. Size: head itself measures 15" x 8" x 11" (38 x 20.3 x 27.9 cm); 21" high on base

    Condition: Losses to ushnisha, rashmi, and ears. Chips, abrasions, and scratches in stone surfaces consistent with age.

    Provenance: Ex-private Northern Colorado collection.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Huge 16th C. Thai Sandstone Head of Buddha

  • Southeast Asia, Thailand, ca. 20th century CE. A near miniature seated Buddha hand carved from natural, striated ruby. The Buddha sits in the Samadhi mudra in half lotus position upon a five-lined canopied throne with hands displaying a Samadhi or Dhyana mudra of meditation with joined thumbs forming a triangle that is symbolic of the Three Jewels (Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha) and by extension, soundness of the body and the mind. Reminiscent of the Ayutthaya-style Buddha Shakyamuni, with his face displaying a serene expression, downcast eyes below arched eyebrows, smiling lips and curled headdress and ushnisha surmounted by a flame. Beyond the rich iconography and finely delineated detailing commensurate with outstanding technique and artistry is the inherent beauty of the stone. The natural ruby of this piece is mesmerizing with myriad striations in the stone of berry red hues that range from bright magenta to deep, more subdued violet. A work of spiritual art that truly dazzles the eye. Size: 2-1/2" x 1-3/8" (6.4 x 3.5 cm)

    Provenance: Ex-private Northern Colorado collection.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    20th C. Thai Carved Buddha - Natural Ruby

  • Far East, China, found in the Philippines, ca. 16th century CE. This is a group of porcelain from a a Ming period Chinese shipwreck off the coast of Busuanga, Philippines. It contains a large porcelain platter with a blue on white orchid design and two bowls with blue and white floral motifs on the interiors and exteriors. There are also Sanskrit characters on the bowl, which would have been a symbol of Buddhism. These were found in 1997. Ming Dynasty China (1368 to 1644) is known as one of the longest periods of social and and governmental stability in human history. During this time period, China's was the great naval power of the East, with technology that surpassed anything that Europe had yet developed; this was the time of Zheng He and China's role as an international trader from the Mediterranean to the south Pacific. As the Ming period progressed, and the political conditions that had held the overland Silk Route together deteriorated, a Maritime Silk Road became more important to Chinese trade. Interestingly, many of the elements of these porcelains -- which would have been produced in China, under the control of the Imperial Court maintained Bureau of Design that ensured uniform standards in the production of ceramics -- had been inspired by Islamic art from further west trading opportunities. These come with two beautiful wooden stands for the small bowls. Size: Platter is 12-1/2" diameter x 2-1/2" H (32 cm x 6 cm); bowls are 5-3/4" diameter x 3" H (15 cm x 8 cm). Published in Arts of Asia, Volume 28, Number 3, May/June 1998: 76-88.

    Provenance: Ex-private Northern Colorado collection, ex-Orientations Gallery, San Francisco, under the authority of the National Art Museum of the Philippines.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Group of Chinese Ming Dynasty Shipwreck Porcelains

  • Japan, 19th century CE. This is a lacquered, painted, and gold-leafed wooden shrine depicting the Lotus Sutra as performed by two fully robed Buddhas seated atop lotus blossoms. Behind them are golden mandralas, and on the mandralas is written Namu Myoho Renge Kyo, which means, "Devotion to the Mystic Law of the Lotus Sutra or Glory to the Sutra of the Lotus of the Supreme Law", a chanted mantra in Nichiren Buddhism (a predominant Japanese form of the religion). The color of the paint on this piece is excellent, especially on the lotus flowers and the Buddhas; the decoration on their robes is exquisite. The piece is also much lighter than expected, giving it a delicacy. Size: 13-1/4" H x 10" W x 3" L (34 cm x 25 cm x 8 cm).

    Provenance: Ex-private Loveland, Colorado collection.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    19th C. Japanese Lacquered Wood, Gold Buddhist Shrine