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  • Rome, Ca. 1st century CE. A superb cast bronze fitting of an eagle, a symbol of power and greatness for the Romans. Cast in soaring position, this eagle has delicately incised feather patterns across neck, back, chest and wings. Eyes are alert and staring ahead, while beak remains tightly shut. A deep green patina has formed over piece with areas of light green and red on back of piece. A supreme and striking example of Roman craftsmanship. 1-1/8"H x 2-1/2"L. Custom stand.

    Provenance: Ex-private German Collection acquired in the 1970s. Acquired at German auction house.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Roman Bronze Eagle Fitting

  • Pre-Columbian, South Coast Peru, Paracas, ca. 600 to 500 BCE. One of the most impressive Paracas ceramic vessels we have ever seen, this bottle with its pristine spherical body and spool shaped attenuated neck is anthropomorphosed with a finely delineated head of a warrior, ruler, or shaman donning an impressive striated helmet. His visage is elegantly modeled with protruding slitted eyes, a straight nose, crescent moon shaped ears, and slightly emerging closed lips. The gentleman appears to be in a trancelike or prayerful state with his closed eyes, scarification or tear marks, and an overall solemn expression. His body is further delineated with incised arms and legs hugging the contours of the sphere. Both hands gesture toward a geometric glyph, perhaps a stylized "God's Eye" glyph, incised upon his chest. Additional geometric symbols adorn the remainder of the sphere. Ceramics were a significant form of visual culture created by the Paracas artisans. Usually their vessels were actually decorated after the firing process with resin-based colors, but here the rich textural red and orange slips that contast so nicely with the smooth, black bottom and rim as well as the painstakingly incised details were created prior to the firing process. A rare example from this very early Peruvian culture, impressive for its overall orb-like form symbolizing the greater cosmos or universe as a harmonious whole and sublime modeled and incised anthropomorphic countenance! Size: 10.75" in diameter x 11" H to tip of head (27.3 cm x 27.9 cm)

    Provenance: Ex-California Museum of Ancient Art

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Huge Paracas Anthropomorphic Polychrome Vessel

  • Pre-Columbian, Central Peru, probably Cusco region, post-conquest Inca, ca. 1530 to 1550 CE. A very unusual silver flask, notable because while it clearly demonstrates silversmith skills mastered by the indigenous of the Andes, it also presents certain features that reveal Spanish influence. The vessel is adorned with a beautiful repousse head presenting a face framed by a striated coiffure and three feathers on the forehead; this detail is especially significant, for it indicates that the image belongs to an Inca ruler and is thus an important portrait . Interestingly, this visage is delineated with features that venture more toward naturalism than was customary for the indigenous, and suggests Spanish influence. In addition, the lion paws on the twin handles that join the cylindrical spout to the shoulders are very European. To create this piece, the ancient metalsmith hammered a silver piece into a very thin sheet, and then used fine-grained stone anvils and hammer stones made of hematite or green porphyry, sometimes with animal hide attached, and a wooden template to create the form and its repousse ornamentation, as the metalsmith hammered the silver sheet upon the wooden template. Clearly this was a piece was treated as one of great importance, as it boasts an elegant pedestaled form with meticulously delineated figural work and ornate lion paws. Size: 4.875" W x 7.375" H (12.4 cm x 18.7 cm)

    Provenance:Ex-private Thousand Oaks, CA collection

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Post-Conquest Inca Silver Flask - Spanish Influence

  • Persia (Iran), Nishapur area, ca. late 11th to 12th century CE. A pottery oil lamp in the distinctive Nishapur style, glazed in a beautiful, iridescent blue-green. The pinched top bowl, with its very narrow spout for a wick, sits atop a long, thin neck over a lower bowl with a slightly raised rim. A thin, strap handle descends from top to bottom. The body of this lamp and others of its style is made of finely ground quartz mixed with clay; this created a white surface on which the artists could paint designs directly. The glaze is alkaline, with a copper base to give it its color, and would be poured over the clay. These pieces may have been inspired by the blue and white glazed pottery that traveled the Silk Road from Tang Dynasty China, but the end result here is clearly not just an imitation, but an entirely different, radical style developed in Nishapur. Size: 3" W x 2.9" H (7.6 cm x 7.4 cm)

    Provenance: Ex-private Thousand Oaks, CA collection

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Tall Persian Nishapur Green Glazed Oil Lamp

  • Pre-Columbian, Post Classic Maya, Mixtec, modern day Mexico, ca. 1200 to 1500 CE. This is an engraved copper pendant in a trapezoid shape depicting an abstract figure. Size: 2.5" L x 2.75" W (6.4 cm x 7 cm)

    Condition: Expected wear with patina and slight dirt encrustation.

    Provenance: Private Ohio Collection, Bennett Auction May 2015

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Mixtec Copper Engraved Pendant

  • Pre-Columbian, Central Mexico, Guerrero region, Mezcala / Chontal, ca. 800 to 400 BCE. Hand-carved, string-cut, and pecked from an gorgeous grey stone with white and russet inclusions, an abstract, stylized standing figure with a characteristically oversized head, deeply undercut neck, projecting lower jaw, rotund torso (with a delineated belly button), and incised lines suggesting attenuated limbs. The figure's visage is quite expressive with its pecked round eyes, straight nose, and open mouth. The Chontal and Mezcala artists created portable sculpture grave offerings. This example presents a blend of the dramatically abstract Mezcala stylings with the relatively more naturalistic features of the Chontal, these most visible in the contours of the facial planes. The beauty of the stone in addition to the elegant delineation of the form make for an impressive piece. Custom, museum-quality stand. Size: 4.125" W x 8.125" H (10.5 cm x 20.6 cm); 9.25" H (23.5 cm) on stand

    Condition: Surface abrasions and old tiny loss to back of right leg. Nice pecking marks visible on top of head and eyes.

    Provenance: Ex-Nayberg collection acquired in the 1970's

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Large Guerrero Mezcala / Chontal Green Stone Figure

  • Pre-Columbian, Caribbean, probably Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, or Jamaica, Taino, ca. 1000 to 1500 CE. A special ceremonial pestle, skillfully hand-carved from a rich green stone with twin skeletal Zemi figural heads, each one boldly delineated with circular ocular cavities, nasal bones, wide open oral cavities, and jutting chins. Extending between their ears are incised headbands. Taino art is comprised of many religious objects associated with the worship of "zemis" - a term referring to deities, ancestors, or earth spirits believed to be inhabited by powerful spirits. It is possible that this pestle was used to create Cohoba powder that is traditionally inhaled by a shaman to produce hallucinogenic effects and visions during a ritual that the Tainos interpret as apparitions of spirits who deliver important messages. Size: 5.25" W x 6.625" H (13.3 cm x 16.8 cm)

    Condition: Minor surface wear with a few small losses here and there as shown. Nice pecking marks.

    Provenance: Ex-Private Orange County, CA collection acquired before 1980

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Important Taino Double Zemi-Headed Stone Pestle

  • PRICE ON REQUEST

    Greece, Hellenistic Period, purportedly found in Centuripae, Sicily, ca. 3rd to 2nd century BCE. An amazing terracotta figure of a young man, Cadmus, naked, standing with legs crossed, in the act of strangling a serpent. The figure retains the remains of bright red gesso. Comes with custom stand. Size: 4.3" L x 5.4" W x 16.7" H (10.9 cm x 13.7 cm x 42.4 cm); height on stand: 18" (45.7 cm).

    The sculpted details of the piece are amazing, showing off the Greek command of naturalistic sculpture and the human form - Cadmus is depicted in an ideal form, with the details of his musculature well-rendered and clear. The serpent has fine, scaly details and its sinuous curves further emphasize the artist's merit.

    The figure tells the story of Cadmus, founder and first king of Thebes, who killed a serpent (a water dragon) protected by the war god Ares. On Athena's advice, Cadmus buried the teeth of the beast in the soil, releasing a legion of fierce men - the Spartoi, who helped Cadmus found the city of Thebes. Ares, angry at the killing of the serpent, demanded the Cadmus serve him for eight years.

    Condition: Repaired from approximately nine original pieces with restoration over most of the breaklines. Old collection number affixed above the buttocks, and an early brass and ribbon collection tag around right ankle, embossed “Douaie Paris”.

    Provenance: Ehe Breitbart Collection, acquired from the Estate of Dr. Jacob Hirsch, NYC. acquired from Joseph Ternbach, NYC, August 1964, with copy of letter from Ternbach. CIRAM TL test with this lot.

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    Important Greek Terracotta Statue of Man & Serpent

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    Northwestern Greece, ca. late 6th to 5th centuries BCE. A war helmet made of hammered bronze sheet, with a rectilinear opening for the face, long, pointed cheek pieces, and twin parallel ridges on the crown frame the crest. The back and sides flare out slightly to guard the neck and have pseudo-rivets incised around them. Wearable, but made for a small head! Comes with custom stand. Size: 9.3" L x 7.25" W x 9.5" H (23.6 cm x 18.4 cm x 24.1 cm); height on stand: 14.4" (36.6 cm).

    These helmets were particularly popular in northern Greece, in the province of Illyria, in the modern day Balkans. They were made for hoplites, the citizen-soldiers of the Greek city states, who often furnished their own bronze armor. As a result, regional styles developed and there is a great deal of variation in shape and form.

    Armor was not just for battle, however. The pseudo-rivets on this example show that this was made for parades or to be worn in death - on a battle helmet, those rivets would have been real, to attach to a leather guard. Excavations at Sindos in Macedonia, a necropolis with the remains of Greek soldiers, have found that there was a standardized and probably ritualized method for burial. This included the placement of armor in carefully proscribed areas of the body. The helmet was placed over the head, along with a strip of gold over the mouth and possibly others over the eyes. See similar examples to this helmet from the Metropolitan Museum of Art (1992.180.1, 2006.221, 2003.407.6) and the Louvre (CA 2221Or).

    Condition: Invisible repairs to top, side, and to one lower part of cheek piece. Excellent bronze patina overall.

    Provenance: Ex- Private S. Dakota collection acquired at German auction house in the early 2000's

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Fine Greek Illyrian Bronze Helmet

  • Egypt, Third Intermediate Period to Late Dynastic Period, ca. 1070 to 332 BCE. A heavy and detailed cast bronze figure of the mummiform god of the Underworld, Osiris. This would have been a votive figure, perhaps made to be kept in a wealthy home and prayed to, deposited in a temple as an offering, or kept for ritual with other metallic objects by priests. Comes with custom stand. Size: 2.2" W x 8.5" H (5.6 cm x 21.6 cm); height on stand: 9.25" (23.5 cm)

    He wears a tight shroud and Atef crown, with two lateral plumes flanking a uraeus. In his hands, which he holds close together at his chest, he has a flagellum and a short-handled heka scepter (perhaps indicating that this piece is from Thebes) - Egyptian symbols of authority and kingship, showing Osiris's close connection with the pharaoh and his role as Ruler of the Dead. He has a round face, with almond-shaped eyes, large ears, and thick lips below a straight nose. He also has the classic Egyptian false beard, incised to look like it is braided. Incised decoration gives further detail to his tools, his crown, and a pectoral underneath his shroud.

    Condition: Smooth, dark green patina over entire surface, with very vivid details.

    Provenance: Ex-Private East Coast, USA Collection

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    Tall Egyptian Bronze Osiris Figure