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Textile

 
  • Far East, South China, Yao/Mien, ca. 1900 CE. A fine and rare heirloom wedding blanket of an intricate embroidered geometric design from the Yao, sometimes referred to as the Mien, culture. Size: Textile without border measures 38-1/2" x 24" (97.8 x 61 cm); with border 47" x 33" (119.4 x 83.8 cm).

    The textile is made from two panels of hand spun and hand woven cotton with natural dyes in hues of indigo blue, cornflower blue, tan, and light beige. Two narrow panels of near miniature stylized geometric patterns border two ends of the piece, and the entire composition is framed with a generous indigo cotton border. The Yao are a widespread ethnic people with branches in China, Thailand, and Vietnam -- a Daoist/Taoist culture that blends ancient animist beliefs with Chinese Daoist philosophy. Hence, their textile designs boast a great variety.

    Provenance: Ex-Historia Antiques, James Caswell, Santa Monica, CA

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

    We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. Learn More

    19th C. Chinese Embroidered Wedding Blanket ex-Historia

  • Pre-Columbian, Peru, north coast, Chimu/Inca culture, ca. 800 to 1400 CE. Woven textile coca bag panels in shades of brown, black and tan. Left panel woven with multiple birds in various orientations, right panel with standing human figures. Comes in custom Lucite stand and ready to hang and enjoy! Size of textile itself: 16.5" W x 10" H (41.9 cm x 25.4 cm); framed size: 21.5" x 14"

    Provenance: Ex-Slavin Collection, acquired in Peru & Bolivia, 1971-1972

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

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    Chimu Polychrome Textile Panel / Coca Bag

  • Pre-Columbian, Peru, Huari (Wari) culture, ca. 500 to 1000 CE. A brightly-colored textile fragment, a neck piece, designed to dangle from the front of clothing. It shows a human head and twin rows of yellow, brown, pink, and red/dark pink fringes, terminating in two long fringes of the red/dark pink color. This matches to the color of the figure's clothing and hat. Mounted on a black background. Size: 19" L (48.3 cm)

    The Huari, from their large urban center north of modern day Ayacucho, colonized a diverse group of people in the Andes. Part of the evidence for their colonization efforts - beyond the standardized architecture throughout their empire - is the presence of iconographically similar textiles in burials throughout the region. Human heads with distinctive facial decoration and caps are a common motif; this may relate to the use of human heads as trophy objects, or perhaps for the veneration of ancestors, a common theme on Huari (and other Peruvian) ceramics. Some have suggested that the wearing of certain types of motifs or textile items in life (because the textiles the Huari are buried with seem to have been worn by the living before they were used in burial) showed rank in the complex imperial structure that the Huari created.

    Provenance: Ex-Slavin Collection, acquired in Peru & Bolivia, 1971-1972

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

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    Vibrant Ica / Wari Textile Neck Piece

  • Central America, Panama, San Blas Islands, Kuna/Cuna, second half of the 20th century CE. This is a fun example of this folk art form created by Kuna women. Its main focus are two large animals - maybe foxes? - with huge, bushy tails and wearing eyeglasses. Small bird heads have been applied around the design. Molas are cloth panels attached to the fronts and backs of women's blouses that are the cultural dress of Kuna women, along with gold nose rings, beaded arm and leg bands, and patterned wrap-around skirts. Size of mola on backing: 17.5" W x 13" H (44.4 cm x 33 cm)

    Provenance: Ex - Himrod estate, Anaheim, CA

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

    We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. Learn More

    Panamanian Mola - Animals in Eyeglasses

  • Central America, Panama, San Blas Islands, Kuna/Cuna, ca. 1950 CE. A finely crafted example of this folk art form created by the Kuna / Cuna Native American women artisans of Panama, and from the world's finest collection of molas, depicting a vampire bat or chupa de sangre (literal translation being sucks blood) with outspread wings, upraised claws, and an up-to-no-good visage comprised of wide eyes a fang-filled grin. The mola is comprised of many layers of fabric in brilliant hues of orange, red, black, blue, pink, lavender, green, white, and yellow with topstitched embroidery in colorful threads detailing the face and claws. According to Parker and Neal, "Bats, the familiar murcielagos or raton viejos of Latin-American life and literature, are well known in San Blas and are often used creatively in folktales and on molas. At night tiny oil lamps are kept burning in Cuna huts to prevent the evil chupa de sangre or vampire bat from entering and attacking the occupants." (Ann Parker and Avon Neal, "Molas: Folk Art of the Cuna Indians" New York: Crown Publishing, p. 87) Quite an impressive example, replete with superb artistry, technique, and highly symbolic iconography. Size: 18" W x 16" H (45.7 cm x 40.6 cm)

    We are honored to present a selection of molas from the important Kit Kapp collection. According to Tom Hannaher in his text from a debut exhibition of Kuna Molas from the Kit Kapp collection, "Between 1963 and 1971, Kitt Kapp and his wife Valerie conducted over 35 expeditions of the San Blas Islands, as well as remote Kuna villages in Colombia and along the Bayano River in the Darien Peninsula of Panama. Kit's book, Mola Art of the San Blas Islands, was one of the first publications to treat molas as an art form." (Molas from the Collection of Kit Kapp," by Tom Hannaher, 2008)

    The folk craft of creating molas began about 125 years ago when the Kunas moved from the mainland to the islands. In their new environment, cooler nights necessitated warmer clothing. At first, women created blouses adorned with simple applique borders, but as time went on, they increased the scale of the decorative areas until the entire front and back panels were comprised of multi-layered, quilted textile designs. This distinctive art form has evolved into a tradition of exceptionally fine needlework and meaningful symbolism.

    Provenance: Ex-Kit Kapp collection formed in the very early 1970's. Mr. Kapp acquired the world's largest and best documented collection of Molas, with numerous examples being published.p

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

    We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. Learn More

    Vibrant Kuna Island Textile Mola - Vampire Bat

  • Central America, Panama, San Blas Islands, Kuna/Cuna, ca. 1950 CE. A finely crafted example of this folk art form created by the Kuna / Cuna Native American women artisans of Panama, and from the world's finest collection of molas, rare for its unusual iconography that depicts a female puppeteer in profile holding an expressive puppet in her left hand. Below and to her right is a smaller perhaps animorphic puppeteer holding a more diminuitive puppet. Size: 15.5" L x 17" W (39.4 cm x 43.2 cm)

    We are honored to present a selection of molas from the important Kit Kapp collection. According to Tom Hannaher in his text from a debut exhibition of Kuna Molas from the Kit Kapp collection, "Between 1963 and 1971, Kitt Kapp and his wife Valerie conducted over 35 expeditions of the San Blas Islands, as well as remote Kuna villages in Colombia and along the Bayano River in the Darien Peninsula of Panama. Kit's book, Mola Art of the San Blas Islands, was one of the first publications to treat molas as an art form." (Molas from the Collection of Kit Kapp," by Tom Hannaher, 2008)

    The folk craft of creating molas began about 125 years ago when the Kunas moved from the mainland to the islands. In their new environment, cooler nights necessitated warmer clothing. At first, women created blouses adorned with simple applique borders, but as time went on, they increased the scale of the decorative areas until the entire front and back panels were comprised of multi-layered, quilted textile designs. This distinctive art form has evolved into a tradition of exceptionally fine needlework and meaningful symbolism.

    Provenance: Ex-Kit Kapp collection formed in the very early 1970's. Mr. Kapp acquired the world's largest and best documented collection of molas, with numerous examples being published.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

    We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. Learn More

    Vibrant Kuna Island Textile Mola - Puppeteer

  • Pre-Columbian, Peru, Chancay, ca. 1100 CE. A beautiful doll with a core comprised of natural reeds, the limbs, fingers, and toes comprised of natural reeds wrapped with pink textile threads, and the body, hair, and clothing comprised of cotton and camelid yarns of a wide range of hues. The visage presents large rectangular brown and cream hued eyes, buck teeth stitched with the same colored threads, and a protruding, long nose in the same rosy pink as the rest of the face. A finely woven pink and beige headband with serpent head motifs is wrapped around her crown, with curly 'hair' comprised of netted chocolate brown yarns cascading beyond her shoulders. Her dress features a finely woven horizontal striped pattern in red, azure blue, beige, white, and slate grey threads. Scholars believe that such dolls were created to represent mortals rather than supernatural deities or spirits. Unfortunately most of the purportedly "ancient" Peruvian dolls on the market are in fact made in contemporary times, only comprised of collected ancient textile fragments. This example, however, is in fact an authentic ancient doll. A fabulous example that displays exceptional skill and various techniques, intriguing for its expressive visage, reed limbs with the digits meticulously defined and wound with threads, long curly brunette locks, and finely woven vestments. Custom, museum-quality stand. Size: doll measures 4.5" W x 11" H (11.4 cm x 27.9 cm), 12.75" H (32.4 cm) on stand

    Provenance: Ex - Private Florida collection acquired at Heritage Auctions, Dallas, TX

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

    We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. Learn More

    Early 12th C. Authentic Chancay Textile & Reed Doll

  • Europe, The Netherlands, ca. 17th century CE. A beautiful, large Flemish tapestry depicting two maidens dressed in billowing robes bathing an infant (perhaps a holy one) with another maiden overlooking the scene, all framed by dramatic, billowing curtains. The tapestry presents all the vocabulary of the Baroque style with large figures, billowing draperies, dramatic gestures, and deep colors. Note how the jewel tone blue, teal, and russet hues contrast with the creamy beiges and slate greys. The fleshy bodies recall the influences of Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640) who created tapestry designs for workshops in the early 17th century. A rare and very old example! Size: 74.5" W x 86.75" H (189.2 cm x 220.3 cm)

    Interestingly, leading tapestry centers in the South Netherlands were impacted by religious persecution and civil war of the late 16th century. This inspired many skilled weavers to relocate to North Netherlands (ie. Delft and Middelburg), England, France, and Germanic states. However, the South Netherlands recovered in the early 1600s thanks to the undying support of archdukes Albert and Isabella who placed many commissions and created legislation to prevent further emigration of skilled weavers.

    Provenance: Ex-private P. Nikitovich collection, Denver, CO acquired in 1980s.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

    We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. Learn More

    17th C. Flemish Baroque Tapestry - The Bath

  • Far East, South China, Yao / Mien, ca. 1900 CE. A fine and rare heirloom wedding blanket of an intricately woven geometric design from the Yao, sometimes referred to as the Mien, culture. The textile is made from three panels of hand spun and hand woven cotton with natural dyes in hues of indigo blue, pale pink, light blue, and tawny beige, together presenting a traditional design comprised of stylized geometric motifs, the entire composition bordered with black linen. The Yao are a widespread ethnic people with branches in China, Thailand, and Vietnam -- a Daoist/Taoist culture that blends ancient animist beliefs with Chinese Daoist philosophy. Hence, their textile designs boast a great variety. Size: blanket measures 36.375" L x 25.375" W (92.4 cm x 64.5 cm); with black linen border measures 51.5" L x 41.5" W (130.8 cm x 105.4 cm)

    Provenance: Ex-Historia Antiques, James Caswell, Santa Monica, CA

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

    We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. Learn More

    19th C Chinese Woven Wedding Blanket, ex-Historia

  • Latin America, Mexico, Oaxaca, ca. 1920 CE. Of a characteristic long rectangular blanket-like serape form, tightly woven from cocoa, chocolate brown, and cream hued wool fibers, with an intricate design program of stylized chevrons and key-like motifs. Both ends are handsomely fringed with braided cording of a natural color, and there is an opening in the middle for the wearer's head. A beautiful example! Size: 69" x 34" (175.3 x 86.4 cm).

    Provenance: Ex-Historia Antiques, James Caswell, Santa Monica, CA

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

    We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. Learn More

    1920s Oaxacan Wool Gaban / Poncho, ex-Historia