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Rome

Rome

The Roman Empire produced art for nearly 1,000 years, and was known for its
innovative realistic portraiture as well as its imitation
of the art of surrounding cultures.

Learn more . . .

 
  • Rome, Imperial Period, ca. 1st to 4th period CE. A beautifully carved creamy white marble imperial bust depicting an attractive male elite figure with classicizing features and a wavy coiffure with each curly lock skillfully delineated, the style characteristic of the Julio-Claudian period, beneath a plain headband/diadem, donning an elegant garment/toga wrapped across his torso, its innumerable folds cascading over one another, and presenting a finely modeled visage clearly influenced by a taste for naturalism, yet also demonstrating the Classical World's embrace of idealized portraiture. Custom stand. Size: 2.625" W x 3.75" H (6.7 cm x 9.5 cm); 6.5" H (16.5 cm) on stand

    Condition: Area of loss to left side of garment. Expected surface wear with some pitting to nose and mouth. Marble shows attractive lustrous surface with earthen deposits as shown.

    Provenance: ex-private York, England collection

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all purchases

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    Finely-Carved Roman Marble Bust of a Significant Male

  • Rome, ca. 1st to 3rd century CE. A green glass stirring rod, its shaft of a finely twisted design with a substantive round disk at one end (presenting a swirled pattern that continues to the twisted body) and a loop handle similar to a shepherd's crook at the other, formed by bending the rod back upon itself while molten and attaching to the other side. While its exact use is unclear to us today, it may have been used to stir honey, cosmetics, or medical preparations. Size: 4.125" L (10.5 cm)

    There is a similar example example at the British Museum (1894.1101.711), and one at the Science Museum, London (A163578).

    Condition: Handle repaired. Otherwise very good.

    Provenance: private New Jersey USA collection, acquired over twenty years ago

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all purchases

    We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. Learn More

    Rare Roman Glass Stirring Stick

  • Rome, ca. 2nd to 4th century CE. Comprised of free-blown translucent glass, a lovely vessel presenting a spherical body wrapped with fine horizontal applied threading all the way to the concave bottom showing a nice broken pontil, a short neck and funnel mouth with an out-folded rib. The fine trail of opaque glass was carefully wound around the entire body of the vessel from the bottom to the base of the neck. The surface presents nice areas of rainbow and blue-green iridescence. A fabulous example! Custom lucite stand with a small recess, cleverly designed to fit the protruding broken pontil on the base. Size: 3.375" in diameter x 3.25" H (8.6 cm x 8.3 cm); 3.625" H (9.2 cm) on stand

    Condition: Minor losses to horizontal trailing. Else intact and excellent.

    Provenance: Ex-Private East Coast, USA Collection

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all purchases

    We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. Learn More

    Roman Clear Glass Jar with applied Threading

  • Rome, Imperial Period, ca. 1st century CE. This is an absolutely stunning bronze vase with a slender, tall design. It has a slightly flared, concave foot with multiple rings around its underside. The body has a rounded shoulder that flows easily into the neck; this flares outward and has a flanged, overhanging rim. Attached to the neck and mid-body is a sharply-angled bronze handle with a leaf-shaped finial at top and Gorgon face at bottom. Size: 5.1" W x 10.2" H (13 cm x 25.9 cm)

    The years have given it a beautiful turquoise patina over its entire surface. The blueish tint to the patina indicates that the copper alloy used to make this bronze had a relatively high tin content, so the bronze will have been stronger than alloys with less tin content. The presence of the gorgon speaks to the Classical world of mythology; the concept of the gorgon, a frightening, beast-like, female creature, is at least as old as Homer and continued to be used as a monstrous symbol throughout the Roman period. This jug was probably made to hold wine; its fine craftsmanship and expensive material suggest it was owned by a wealthy Roman individual.

    Condition: Slight denting around the widest part of the body. Handle is possibly not contemporary. Smooth, beautiful patina overall.

    Provenance: Ex-Private East Coast, USA Collection

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all purchases

    We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. Learn More

    Beautiful Roman Bronze Jug w/ Incredible Patina

  • Roman, late Imperial Period, ca. 4th to 6th century CE. A charming and highly detailed oil lamp in the form of an inquisitive bird, posed with head cocked, a seed grasped in its beak. The bird is perched on a round, concave base, and its body has multiple hooks and openings for use as a hanging oil lamp. Shallow incised curves and lines on the body give the appearance of smoothed feathers. Size: 4.6" L x 2.05" W x 3.5" H (11.7 cm x 5.2 cm x 8.9 cm)

    Pigeons (doves) were incredibly popular in ancient Rome - Pliny records a "mania" for pigeons, with people constructing elaborate dovecotes (columbaria) atop their houses to keep the birds. Varro's Rerum Rusticarum describes the breeding and keeping of pigeons, mostly for the table, and kept in a peristeron or peristerotrophion, which could hold up to five thousand of the birds. Whomever made this lamp was closely observant of the animals, recording not just a common pose, but also adding twin bumps on the beak which are indicative of pigeon pox. Made of bronze, this would have been an item kept by a wealthy person, perhaps one who had a special passion for birds.

    Condition: Small loss to tip of tail and to base. One of the rings for attaching a chain has split. Beautiful bright green patina over nearly all of surface.

    Provenance: Ex-Private East Coast, USA Collection

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all purchases

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    Late Roman Bronze Hanging Oil Lamp in Bird Form

  • Roman, Imperial Period, ca. 1st to 4th century CE. A cast bronze pyxis depicting scenes of fantastical animals in low relief. Chasing around its lid are a rabbit and two pegasi; around the exterior base is a scene of lions hunting deer. The interior is smooth and the pyxis stands on a round foot. A hinge and a fitted clasp project upwards from the wide rim. The lid has a handle terminating in a tiny, round loop for suspension. Size: 3.05" W x 2.25" H (7.7 cm x 5.7 cm)

    The pyxis form is found throughout the ancient Near East and the Classical world: a rounded vessel with small fitted lid, originally made to hold cosmetics, trinkets, or jewelry. Later Christian examples were made to hold the Host. This example is clearly from a pre-Christian time - replete with symbols full of meaning for the Romans, like the hunting prowess and power of the lion and the Olympian connections of the Pegasus.

    Condition: Hinge is missing its pin and the lid seems to have lost its attachment to the hinge. Otherwise intact, with dark patina.

    Provenance: Ex-Private East Coast, USA Collection

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all purchases

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    Roman Bronze Lidded Pyxis - Pegasus & Lions

  • Roman, Imperial Period, ca. 1st to 2nd century CE. A mold-made ceramic oil lamp with a scene on its sunken discus of winged Cupid holding tightly to the tail of a small dog. Is this a hunting scene? Or a playful one? A loop handle projects from one end, while an ornate, arrow-head-shaped nozzle projects from the other. It sits on a round, flat base with no makers' mark and has been painted with an earthy orange-red pigment. Size: 4.25" L x 2.55" W x 1.7" H (10.8 cm x 6.5 cm x 4.3 cm)

    Condition: Intact, with very clear artwork.

    Provenance: Ex-Private East Coast, USA Collection

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all purchases

    We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. Learn More

    Roman Redware Pottery Oil Lamp - Cupid & Dog

  • Rome, ca. 2nd to 3rd century CE. A breathtaking vessel comprised of translucent yellow-green glass with a near-spherical body that rests on a concave bottom, a tall tubular neck that extends into a flared spout, the glass elegantly folding back onto the neck to create a hollow-form rim. The fine blue-green trail handle joins shoulder to mid-neckline; another trail encircling the circumference of the neck meets it. Beautiful fire polished surface with iridescent highlights. Size: 3.875" W x 6.75" H (9.8 cm x 17.1 cm)

    Condition: Two cracks on neck as shown. Otherwise excellent.

    Provenance: Ex-Private East Coast, USA Collection

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all purchases

    We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. Learn More

    Stunning Roman Yellow-Green Glass Vessel - Aqua Handle

  • Ancient Rome, ca. 2nd to 3rd century CE. A free-blown glass double unguent of pale aqua blue-green hues with elegant dark-blue rigaree wrapped around the conjoined unguents as well as their shared neck. Further enhancing the piece are twin trailed handles, also in deep blue and a trailed loop handle perpendicular to these on the neck. All in all a very unusual form as most double unguents do not share a neck. Brilliant iridescence too. Lucite stand. Size: 2.25" W x 4.5" H (5.7 cm x 11.4 cm); 5.125" H (13 cm) on stand

    Wealthy women in ancient Rome used pieces like this to contain precious oils, perfumes, or cosmetics. The rather unique design of this example - with its trailed handles set lower than usual (these more commonly bridge rims of necks to the upper ends of unguents), a third loop handle set perpendicular and above these, and most of all, the single neck shared by these two unguents which results in a form that resembles the lower half of a voluptuous female body with a narrow waist and substantive legs - sets it apart from most double unguents.

    Condition: Slight losses to rigaree and some encrustation, but otherwise excellent. Areas of rainbow and silver iridescence.

    Provenance: Ex-Private East Coast, USA Collection

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all purchases

    We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. Learn More

    Roman Glass Double Unguent in Rare Form

  • Ancient Rome, ca. 1st to 3rd century CE. An action-packed marble stela featuring a fierce hunter, perhaps Alexander the Great, wearing a lion's skin, just as Heracles did, in order to signify his Dorian descent, riding a powerful steed, his sword raised to slay the lion below. The image is beautifully carved in relief; the sculptor displaying great artistry and skill. A special example, with iconography similar to imagery on the Alexander Sarcophagus and the Pella mosaic. Size: 8.625" W x 8.75" H (21.9 cm x 22.2 cm); 10.5" H (26.7 cm) on stand

    The renowned lion hunt mosaic from Pella, shows Alexander the Great donning a lion skin, about to slay a lion. The hunt scene on the Alexander sarcophagus shows similar imagery. Scholars have argued that the lion depicted in Alexander scenes like that on the Alexander Sarcophagus (late 4th century BCE) and the Pella mosaic (also 4th century BCE) may have been meant to represent the Persian empire, feistily attacking but doomed to defeat.

    In the classical world, lions symbolized power, wealth, and might. They were famously featured in many ancient myths, perhaps the most famous being that of Heracles slaying the Nemean lion for his first labor. The lions fur was believed to be impenetrable to attacks since according to legend it was made of gold and its claws were far sharper than swords with the power to slice through armor. In the end, Heracles defeated the lion by strangling it and wore its skin.

    Lions were also favorite iconography for buildings, coins, and statues. Examples include the Lions Gate to the Citadel of Mycenae, the Terrace of the Lions on the island of Delos, and the lion hunt mosaic from Pella featuring Alexander engaged in a lion hunt. Of course lions were also used in the Roman arenas where they would fight other animals, such as tigers and bears. Today one would never imagine lions in ancient Greece; however, they did live there. Unfortunately, this animal became extinct partially due to human intervention.



    Condition: Remarkably well-preserved with some expected surface wear and encrustation, but the imagery is quite vivid.

    Provenance: Ex-private Mazard Family Collection, NYC acquired in the 1980s

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all purchases

    We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. Learn More

    Roman Marble Stela, Equestrian Alexander Attacking Lion