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Rome

 
  • Ancient Rome, ca. 1st to 3rd century CE. A bronze cast attachment depicting a bust of an Amazon woman, perhaps the legendary Amazon Queen Penthesilea who partipated in the Trojan War or her sister Hippolyta, famous for owning the magical girdle that Ares, God of War, gave to her. The sculptor masterfully delineated the locks of her wavy coiffure and the folds of her cloak tied across her chest but revealing her right breast. A striking piece with gorgeous green patina. Custom stand. Size: 3.5" H (8.9 cm); 4.5" H (11.4 cm) on stand

    The Amazons were a race of female warriors who played prominent roles in various Greek myths and lived in the area that is now the Ukraine. In one myth they attacked the Lycia region but were fended off by Bellerophon. Following this they later attacked Phrygia, but were defeated once again by an army led by Priam who later became king of Troy. During the Trojan War, under the leadership of Queen Penthesilea, the Amazons assisted Priam in defending his city. In one battle, Achilles killed Penthesilea. Throughout the Roman Empire, the Amazons became associated with many historical individuals and several accounts discuss Amazon raids in Anatolia.

    The sexuality of the Amazons is a source of much interest, as no men were allowed to live with them; however, once a year, the Amazons would visit the nearby Gargareans tribe in order to mate and continue their race. They purportedly kept all the female babies but the males were either killed, sent to their fathers, or abandoned in the forest to succumb to the harsh elements of nature.



    Condition: Tiny, near invisible, perforation on back coiffure. Else intact and excellent. Old inventory label on underside of base.

    Provenance: Ex-private D. Meyerson collection, San Francisco, CA

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Expressive Roman Bronze Attachment w/ Amazon

  • Roman Empire, Late Empire, ca. 250 to 550 CE. A near miniature portrait head modeled with naturalistic facial features and large headdress befitting an empress. Adorned with glaze of tawny hues. Custom, wood block stand. Size: 2.8" H (7.1 cm)

    Provenance: Ex-private Green collection, acquired on the London art market in the 1990's.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

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    Near-Miniature Roman Glazed Ceramic Head

  • Roman Empire, ca. 1st to 2nd century CE. Finely sculpted glazed pottery head of Serapis. Serapis was a Graeco-Egyptian god who first appeared around the time of Alexander the Great. Sculpture is shown with thick, wavy locks framing his face, and a full beard and moustache. Size: 2.85" H (7.2 cm)

    Provenance: Ex-private Green collection, acquired on the London art market in the 1990's.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

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    Roman Alabaster Head of Serapis

  • Rome, Ca. 1st century CE. A superb cast bronze fitting of an eagle, a symbol of power and greatness for the Romans. Cast in soaring position, this eagle has delicately incised feather patterns across neck, back, chest and wings. Eyes are alert and staring ahead, while beak remains tightly shut. A deep green patina has formed over piece with areas of light green and red on back of piece. A supreme and striking example of Roman craftsmanship. 1-1/8"H x 2-1/2"L. Custom stand.

    Provenance: Ex-private German Collection acquired in the 1970s. Acquired at German auction house.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

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    Roman Bronze Eagle Fitting

  • Roman Empire, 1st to 2nd century CE. A stunning cast figurine of a standing eagle with raised head and meticulous feather detailing to the head, chest and wings. In ancient Rome the eagle had a powerful military association and would oftentimes bronze eagles would be used as a staff finial and would lead armies into war. To quote a piece of historical fiction set in Roman Britain entitled The Eagle of the Ninth (Rosemary Sutcliff, 1954), "Eagle lost, honor lost; honor lost, all lost." Richly symbolic! Size: 3"H (7.5 cm)

    Provenance: Ex-private East Coast, USA collection.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Roman Cast Bronze Statuette - Proud Eagle

  • Roman, later Imperial Period, ca. 2nd to 5th century CE. A pale red-brown stone intaglio set into a modern 18kt gold ring. The intaglio appears to depict a bearded senator figure wearing a laurel wreath and a toga. The presence of the beard dates the piece as beards were not fashionable until the Emperor Hadrian began to wear them, as Plutarch suggests, to hide the scars on his face. The wearing of a beard was also associated with homage to Greek culture, which was then popular. Ring size 8.75; size of intaglio: 0.25" W x 0.45" H (0.6 cm x 1.1 cm)

    Provenance: Ex-private east coast, USA collection

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Ancient Roman Intaglio in Modern Gold Ring

  • Eastern Roman Empire, ca. 1st to 3rd century CE. Interesting man's ring in silver that was then gilded in lovely deep golden color, table of the ring with Greek inscription in reverse identified partly as "MRL..." US Ring Size 7.

    Provenance: Ex-private east coast, USA collection

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Roman Gilded Silver Ring w/ Greek Inscription

  • Roman, Imperial Period, ca. 1st to 4th century CE. A unique clear glass vial that has attained a very interesting iridescent patina. It's delicate rounded body and long neck with slight flaring rim emphasize the beauty of its method of production. Glass blowing technology, developed in the eastern part of the Roman Empire in the 1st century CE, allowed average Roman citizens to replace their pottery homewares with glass. Comes with custom stand. Size: 2.7" W x 6.45" H (6.9 cm x 16.4 cm) Learn More

    Lovely Roman Glass Lozenge-Shaped Vial

  • Roman Empire, ca. 2nd century CE. In a word, WOW! A stunning, blue-green glass unguent with a flared base, a long tubular neck, a substantial, flattened rim, and a mesmerizing surface that is covered with silvery and rainbow iridescence. Beyond this, the vessel boasts an elegant silhouette. Size: 2" in diameter x 2.5" H (5.1 cm x 6.4 cm)

    Provenance: Ex-Private London Collection

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

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    Incredibly Iridescent Roman Glass Vessel

  • PRICE ON REQUEST

    Anglo-Saxon England, ca. 6th to 8th century CE. An exceedingly fine iron helmet comprised of two wide iron bands attached with rivets supporting an iron "crown." Anglo Saxons helmets, as well as Danish and Viking ones, had a conical shape in order to protect the wearer's head by deflecting direct blows. The most expensive ones, used by kings and nobles, were entirely made of steel and iron while less expensive ones had an iron 'skeleton' to which panels of animal horn, hard leather or even wood were fixed. The face, cheeks and the neck of the wearer were protected by additional elements made of iron plate or other materials. Size: 8" L x 7.6" W x 6" H (20.3 cm x 19.3 cm x 15.2 cm)

    The Saxons were fierce bearded warriors who fought with a ruthless, surprise attack style that intimidated many, even the Romans. Anglo-Saxon society revolved around warfare. Freemen were automatically warriors and were expected to fight from early adolescence. Teenage boys were often taken into a chieftain's household to be trained as warriors. Anglo-Saxon warriors were equipped with javelins and throwing axes as well as swords and shields. In particular a "scramasax" - a single-bladed dagger - was used for close-quarter fighting. Gesiths (serving-men and companions to the king) fought for their hlaford (lord/ breadgiver). Freemen were rewarded for their military service with (at first generally temporary) grants of land. The need to obtain more land for distribution encouraged policies of conquest, and the kings of Wessex were particularly successful because they were able to expand into Cornish territory. One of the most legendary was Alfred the Great, the King of Wessex from 871 to 899, who defended his kingdom against the Viking attempt at conquest and by the time of his demise had become the dominant ruler of England. For these reasons, he was the only English monarch accorded the epithet "the Great". The epithet was retained by succeeding generations of Parliamentarians and empire-builders who saw Alfred's patriotism, success against barbarism, promotion of education and establishment of the rule of law as supporting their own ideals.

    Provenance: Ex-private United Kingdom collection, acquired in the early 1980's.

    All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back.

    A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids.

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    Ancient Anglo-Saxon Iron Helmet